The Wizard of Oz (1939)

The Wizard of Oz

The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 American musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was directed primarily by Victor Fleming.Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson and Edgar Allan Woolf received credit for the screenplay, but there were uncredited contributions by others. Based on the 1900 children’s novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum,[1] the film stars Judy GarlandRay BolgerJack Haley,Bert Lahr, and Frank Morgan, with Billie BurkeMargaret HamiltonCharles GrapewinClara Blandick and the Singer Midgets as the Munchkins.[2] Notable for its use of special effectsTechnicolor, fantasy storytelling and unusual characters, The Wizard of Oz has become, over the years, one of the best-known of all films. It is far and away the best-known version of L. Frank Baum’s book, perhaps even eclipsing the fame of the novel itself. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wizard_of_Oz_(1939_film)

IMDB Ratings: 8.2/10, Dorothy Gale is swept away to a magical land in a tornado and embarks on a quest to see the Wizard who can help her return home. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032138/

 

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Jamaica Inn (1939)

Jamaica Inn is a 1939 film made by Alfred Hitchcock adapted from Daphne du Maurier‘s 1936 novel of the same name, the first of three of du Maurier’s works that Hitchcock adapted (the others were her novel Rebecca and short story “The Birds“). Critics disparaged the film and today it is considered one of Hitchcock’s lesser films.

Charles Laughton was a co-producer as well, and he interfered greatly with Hitchcock’s direction. Laughton was originally cast as the uncle, but he cast himself in the role of villain, which was originally to be a hypocritical preacher, but was rewritten as a squire because unsympathetic portrayals of the clergy were forbidden by the Production Code in Hollywood. Laughton then demanded that Hitchcock give his character, Squire Pengallon, greater screen time. This forced Hitchcock to reveal that Pengallon was a villain in league with the smugglers earlier in the film than Hitchcock had initially planned. Laughton’s acting was a problem point as well for Hitchcock. Laughton portrayed the Squire as having a mincing walk, to the beat of a German waltz which he played in his head, while Hitchcock thought it was out of character. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica_Inn_(film)

IMDB Ratings: 6.2/10, In Cornwall, around 1800, a young woman discovers that she’s living near a gang of criminals who arrange shipwrecks for profit. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0031505/

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is a 1948 American film written and directed by John Huston, a feature film adaptation of B. Traven‘s 1927 novel of the same name, in which two impecunious Americans Fred C. Dobbs (Humphrey Bogart) and Bob Curtin (Tim Holt) during the 1920s in Mexico join with an old-timer, Howard (Walter Huston, the director’s father), to prospect for gold. The old-timer accurately predicts trouble, but is willing to go anyway. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Treasure_of_the_Sierra_Madre_(film)

IMDB Ratings8.5/10   http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040897/

Ningen no jōken / The Human Condition (film trilogy – 1959-1961)

Part I

http://www.peteava.ro/id-622028-ningen-no-joken-i-the-human-condition-i-1959-part-1

 

Part II aka the original Full Metal Jacket movie, which was used by Kubrick in 1984  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_Metal_Jacket

http://www.peteava.ro/id-622091-ningen-no-joken-ii-the-human-condition-ii-part-6

 

Part III

http://www.peteava.ro/id-622185-ningen-no-joken-iii-the-human-condition-iii-part-10

The Human Condition (人間の條件 Ningen no jōken?) is a Japaneseepic film trilogy made between 1959 and 1961. It is based on a novel by Gomikawa Junpei 五味川純平 (1916–1995).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ningen_no_joken

 

Kobayashi wants his audience to feel the soul crushing persistence of evil that war represents and no one who does make it through all three parts of “The Human Condition” can remain untouched. Each part has its own title (“No Greater Love” — Part I; “Road to Eternity” — Part II; and “A Soldier’s Prayer” — Part III) ) and the first and last parts even have their own intermissions. http://www.offoffoff.com/film/2008/the_human_condition.php

视频: Seven Samurai (1954)

Click 2 watch = 视频: Seven Samurai

 

Seven Samurai[1] (七人の侍 Shichinin no Samurai?) is a 1954 Japanese adventure drama film co-written, edited, and directed by Akira Kurosawa. The film takes place in 1587 during the Warring States Period of Japan. It follows the story of a village of farmers that hire seven masterless samurai (ronin) to combat bandits who will return after the harvest to steal their crops.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Samurai

Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (1943)

The second of Universal’s “modernized” Sherlock Holmes films pits the Great Detective (Basil Rathbone, of course) against that “Napoleon of Crime,” Professor Moriarty (Lionel Atwill). Surpassing his previous skullduggery, Moriarty has now aligned himself with the Nazis and has dedicated himself to stealing a top-secret bomb sight developed by expatriate European scientist Dr. Franz Tobel (William Post Jr.). Before being kidnapped by Moriarty’s minions, Tobel was enterprising enough to disassemble his invention and distribute its components among several other patriotic scientists. Racing against the clock, Holmes and Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) try to stem the murders of Tobel’s colleagues and prevent Moriarty from getting his mitts on the precious secret weapon. The now-famous climax finds Holmes playing for time by allowing Moriarty to drain all the blood from his body, drop by drop (“The needle to the last, eh Holmes?” gloats the villain). Dennis Hoeymakes his first appearance as the dull-witted, conclusion-jumping Inspector Lestrade. Constructed more like a serial than a feature film, Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (based loosely on Conan Doyle’s The Dancing Men) is one of the fastest-moving entries in the series; it is also one of the most readily accessible, having lapsed into public domain in 1969. http://www.youtube.com/movie/sherlock-holmes-and-the-secret-weapon

Battleship Potemkin (1925)

After the success of Strike (1924), Sergei Eisenstein was commissioned by the Soviet government to make a film commemorating the uprising of 1905. Eisenstein’s scenario, boiled down from what was to have been a multipart epic of the occasion, focussed on the crew of the battleship Potemkin. Fed up with the extreme cruelties of their officers and their maggot-ridden meat rations, the sailors stage a violent mutiny. This, in turn, sparks an abortive citizens’ revolt against the Czarist regime. The film’s centerpiece is staged on the Odessa Steps, where in 1905 the Czar’s Cossacks methodically shot down rioters and innocent bystanders alike. To Eisenstein, this single bloody incident was the crucible of the successful 1917 Bolshevik revolution, and the result was the “Odessa Steps sequence,” which is often considered the most famous sequence ever filmed; it is certainly one of the most imitated, perhaps most overtly by Brian De Palma in The Untouchables (1987). This triumph of Eisenstein’s “rhythmic editing” technique occurs in the middle of film, not as the climax, as more current film structure might do it. All the actors in the film were amateurs, selected by Eisenstein because of their “rightness” as types for their roles. Pictorial quality varies from print to print, but even in a duped-down version, Battleship Potemkin is must-see cinema. http://www.youtube.com/movie/battleship-potemkin

The Battleship Potemkin (RussianБроненосец «Потёмкин»Bronyenosyets Potyomkin), sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. It presents a dramatized version of the mutiny that occurred in 1905 when the crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin rebelled against their officers of the Tsarist regime.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battleship_Potemkin